4 tips for recovering from Joint Replacement

Joint_ReplacementHave you had or are you waiting for a Joint Replacement? Rehabing and recovering from procedures suchs as hip or knee replacements are very important to maintain and in most cases improve your mobility and way of life. With advancements in surgical procedures and physiotherapy, patients of Tsawwassen Sports & Orthopaedic Physiotherapy Clinic are able to get to an active more fulfilling lifestyle.

The physiotherapy techniques we use at Tsawwassen Sports & Orthopaedic Physiotherapy Clinic are: manual therapy, IMS (Dry Needling), electrical modalities, acupuncture, traction, taping, shockwave and a condition-specific exercise program for all.

Here are 4 tips for rehabing and recovering from joint replacement.

1. Protect your new hips and knee. Joint replacements require precautions and restrictions in movement. Based on instruction from your surgeon, your physiotherapist will advise you on activity and exercise from day 1 to maximize your function within the restrictions.

2. Increase your strength. Seek to gradually do 150 minutes of moderate intensity aerobic activity per week, even in ten-minute bouts. Physiotherapists and surgeons recommend walking, cycling, swimming, water exercises, golf and weight training to start. With experience, you can resume skating, skiing and Pilates exercise. Your physiotherapist can provide you with an exercise program that helps regain your strength, flexibility and balance needed to safely resume these and other recreational activities.

3. Don’t stress out your new joints. Activities that are stressful on your new joints or put you at risk for injury are NOT recommended. These include high impact and contact sports like baseball, basketball, jogging, racquet sports, soccer and hockey. Your physiotherapist will advise you on the best activity and exercise options from day one to maximize your day-to-day function and overall fitness within the restrictions.

4. Following surgery, use walking aids. Do not progress off walking aids too soon as limping puts abnormal forces through your new joint and other joints in your legs and back. Work closely with your physiotherapist to find the right pace at which to increase your walking and reduce your need for walking aids.

Tsawwassen Sports & Orthopaedic Physiotherapy Clinic specializes in physiotherapy on patients who have had joint replacement and want to get on with live.

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SMART Golfing Tips

S.M.A.R.T. GOLFING

A game of golf is a healthy activity to help you to gain and maintain your flexibility and range of motion. It’s a physical activity that includes walking, lifting and repetitive arm motions, giving you the benefits of aerobic and strengthening exercise programs.

The following S.M.A.R.T. tips (Stretch, Move, Add it up, Reduce Strain, Talk to a physiotherapist) have been prepared for you by the Canadian Physiotherapy Association (CPA) to help you get the most enjoyment out of a healthy and active golf season.

STRETCH – BEFORE, DURING AND AFTER YOUR GOLF GAME
Stretching – as a warm-up, as a break during repetitive movements and as a cool-down after your game – helps you to move easily, keeps your muscles flexible and relaxed, your joints mobile, and relieves tension and strain.

Allow approximately 10-minutes to warm up before the first tee to reduce muscle strain, injury and fatigue. Start by getting the blood flowing with climbing stairs, walking or jogging on the spot. Perform the following stretches to warm-up and to cool down at the end of your game. If you begin to feel a bit stiff during your game, pause to do more stretches.

When stretching, remember:

  • Movements should be slow and controlled to the point where you feel a gentle pull of the muscle. If this pull lessens, stretch a little more. It should never be painful;
  • Once you feel a stretch, hold the position for 15-20 seconds. Do not bounce or jerk;
  • Repeat each stretch three times in the same direction; repeat for the opposite side.

MOVE – TODAY FOR TOMORROW
Get moving. Keep moving. Stay moving. Through the seasons. Through life. A game of golf is an excellent way to get your whole body in motion.

  • Leave the golf cart at the club and walk the course to maintain and improve your heart health and overall physical fitness;
  • Rehearse your swing before actually hitting the ball on the course to warm up for that terrain specific stroke and to improve mobility and technique;
  • Don-t stop when the snow flies! There are many indoor golfing facilities that can keep you moving all year round.

ADD IT UP – AN HOUR IS POWER
To gain mobility, plan activities throughout your day that keep you moving for periods of at least 10 minutes. To maintain your mobility, make every movement count. Add up all you do in a day and aim for a minimum of 60 minutes of movement every day. For maximum benefit, physiotherapists recommend regular physical activity and stretching to maintain your physical mobility throughout the year.

  • Pace yourself! Start your season slowly if you haven’t been active over the winter. Consider playing nine holes initially rather than a full 18.
  • Plan your golf games so they are spread throughout the week and build activity into the days you aren’t golfing to maintain your mobility;
  • Make stretching part of your regular daily routine to maintain your flexibility.

REDUCE STRAIN – USE EQUIPMENT THAT WORKS FOR YOU.
Your golf equipment should help your game, not cause additional strain. Take measures to fit your equipment to you, not you to your equipment.

  • Choose your golf equipment to match your skill level and body type;
  • Carry your golf bag over both shoulders and walk upright. If you have a one-strap system, alternate sides and walk upright to reduce strain;
  • Push rather than pull a wheeled golf cart;
  • When lifting, bend your knees, keep your back straight, hold your golf bag close and do not twist your body;
  • When standing for long periods, stand tall and occasionally shift your weight from one foot to the other, or rest one foot on your golf bag or golf cart;
  • After each green, do a few chin tucks and one backward neck bend to counter eying the ball and putting;
  • Hold clubs in a loose, comfortable grip to reduce strain in your hand and forearm;
  • Keep hydrated. Your body needs fluids to move effectively;
  • Take breaks, rest your back and do a few stretches if you find your bag is getting too heavy.

TALK TO A PHYSIOTHERAPIST
Physiotherapists are healthcare professionals who help people of all ages and lifestyles gain and maintain their desired level of active living and physical mobility. With their applied knowledge and understanding of the human body in action, physiotherapists are able to help you to increase your mobility, relieve pain, build strength and improve balance and cardiovascular function. Physiotherapists not only treat injuries, they also teach you how to prevent the onset of pain or injury that can limit your activity.

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Muscle Sprains -Tips to Reduce the Healing Time

Sprain-healing-tipsA sprain is a stretched or torn ligament. Ligaments are tissues that connect bones at a joint. A sprain occurs when trauma (like falling, twisting or getting hit) causes two bones to move beyond their normal range of motion and the ligament is stretched. Ankle and wrist sprains are the most common sprains and symptoms include pain, swelling, bruising and being unable to move the joint.

If you strain a muscle follow the Physio-4 for Sprains, to reduce the chance of a greater injury, speed the healing process and keep moving for life.

In photo: Derrick Young, PrecisionCare Physiotherapy and Natalie Grant, Vancouver Coastal Health Community/Natalie Grant Physiotherapy Home Visits

  1. RICE. The RICE Principle (Rest, Ice, Compression, Elevation) is a good first step following a ligament sprain. Check in with your physiotherapist who will assess your strength, range of motion, and biomechanics to ensure normal function is regained following your injury.
  2. Get relief. If you have injured your ankle or wrist and experience swelling and limited movement, you probably have sprained a ligament and need immediate relief. Your physiotherapist will treat you with deep transverse frictions, electrotherapeutic modalities such as ultrasound and laser, and supportive bracing and taping to start your recovery.
  3. Build strength. Strengthening the muscles surrounding the joint associated with your sprain will help provide needed stability. Your physiotherapist will show you exercises to help you isolate the correct muscles.
  4. Keep moving. Your ability to move your joint is often impaired following a ligament sprain. Your physiotherapist specializing in manual therapy can perform specific, joint mobilizations to ensure the bones are moving optimally as your ligament heals. Keeping moving is important as you recover.

Physiotherapists are the rehabilitation specialists recommended most by physicians. They are university-educated health professionals who work with patients of all ages to diagnose and treat virtually any mobility issue. Physiotherapists provide care for orthopedic issues such as sport and workplace injuries, as well as cardiorespiratory and neurological conditions. As Canada’s most physically active health professionals, BC’s physiotherapists know how to keep British Columbians moving for life.

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Shoulder Injuries: Tips to a Faster and Better Recovery

Shoulder_Recovery_TipsThe shoulder joint is the most movable joint in the body. It is comprised of the collarbone, the shoulder blade, and the upper arm bone.  Shoulders are prone to injury because they are by nature unstable since the ball of the upper arm is larger than the socket that holds it. Hence it is the site of many common problems such as sprains, strains, dislocations, rotator cuff tears, and frozen shoulder.

If you have shoulder pain or suffer an injury to your shoulder, seek the advice of a physiotherapist early to determine the exact nature of your problem. Early treatment and following the Physio-4 for Shoulders can result in patients having a faster and better recovery. Some shoulder problems require surgery, and professional guidance is essential during your recovery. Physiotherapists can help you avoid common complications after surgery, restore your strength and flexibility and get you back to your activities as quickly as possible.

In photo: Lindsay McLeod, Synergy Physio and Cameron Bennett, ActiveShoulder.com

  1. Get in balance. The shoulder joint needs the perfect balance of strength and flexibility to keep it in great shape and injury free. Your physiotherapist can assess your movement and show you how to strengthen the rotator cuff to keep the shoulder positioned optimally in the joint to prevent improper mechanics while moving the arm..
  2. Correct poor postural habits. Improving your movement, strengthening your shoulder muscles, and correcting poor postural habits can improve your shoulder function and reduce pain. Learning the right skills for your activity is important for preventing many shoulder injuries. Your physiotherapist is a movement expert who can prescribe specific exercises to improve your movement and posture.
  3. Keep it loose. Frozen shoulder is a debilitating and painful condition, which is a common complication of many shoulder injuries. Physiotherapists can help with pain relief and a faster recovery, and show you how to keep the shoulder moving through the full available range of motion to maintain optimal muscle balance around the shoulder girdle. Your physiotherapist can provide specific exercises to correct imbalances.
  4. Get the right advice. Shoulder dislocations, separations and instabilities require specialized rehabilitation to protect your injury and have you back to full activity. Consulting a physiotherapist can reduce the need for shoulder surgery; if you need surgery your physiotherapist will refer you to a physician.  Your physiotherapist can help you with pain relief, protection from further injury and a full rehabilitation plan.

Physiotherapists are the rehabilitation specialists recommended most by physicians. They are university-educated health professionals who work with patients of all ages to diagnose and treat virtually any mobility issue. Physiotherapists provide care for orthopedic issues such as sport and workplace injuries, as well as cardiorespiratory and neurological conditions. As Canada’s most physically active health professionals, BC’s physiotherapists know how to keep British Columbians moving for life.

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Swimming Injury Tips

Compared to other sports, swimming has a relatively low risk of injury. However, the most common body part injured while swimming is the shoulder. Shoulder pain can be caused by muscle overuse, incorrect technique or swimming only one stroke during every workout. Whatever the reason, these factors can lead to shoulder discomfort and injury, most commonly rotator cuff tendinitis.


Physiotherapist Chiara Singh (Surrey Memorial Hospital) is a triathlete who
knows the value of swim techniques to race fast and remain injury-free.


If you feel pain during or after swimming, your physiotherapist can help.

 

 

Swim Tips to prevent injury, alleviate pain and keep you moving for life.

 

1. Be mindful of body rotation. Never swim with a flat body as this limits the rotation of the shoulder along the axis of the spine. Develop a symmetrical way to rotate your body for an efficient breathing pattern and this will greatly reduce the risk of shoulder injuries.

2. Enter the water with a flat hand. A hand directed outwards when entering the water leads to unhealthy internal rotation. This is one of the most common causes of acute pain in the shoulder as it overuses the muscles. It is best to enter the water with a flat hand, fingertips first.

3. Maintain good posture. The saying shoulders back, chest forward applies both in and out of the water. Hunched or rounded shoulders can lead to shoulder injuries and cross-overs in your stroke. Strengthening the muscles at the back of the shoulder and stretching those at the front will help prevent injury, and help you to swim faster.

4. Incorporate bilateral breathing into your swim workout. Breathing only on one side will develop the muscles on that side more than the other. This can eventually lead to shoulder problems. By breathing on both sides with every workout you can prevent this from happening.

And remember when swimming outdoors, never dive head first into water unless the depth is known. And, when swimming in lakes or oceans be aware of any natural hazards such as tides and rapids, and never swim alone.

BC physiotherapists are the most physically active healthcare professionals in Canada and the ones physicians recommend most.


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Muscle Strain Tips

4 Tips to Minimize Damage and Speed the Healing Process from Strains

A strain is a stretched or torn muscle or tendon. Tendons are tissues that connect muscle to bone. A strain occurs when a muscle is stretched beyond its limits during the course of everyday activities like with a sudden lift or a twist during sport or while performing a work task. Strains can happen suddenly or develop over time like in the case of repetitive strain. Back and hamstring muscle strains are common. Typically the local area is painful, swollen, red and bruised and the muscle may spasm and become weak.

Your physiotherapist can work with you to minimize the amount of damage from an injury and speed the healing process. Small and simple changes to your movements, combined with adequate muscle strength and following the Physio-4 for Strains, can prevent muscle strains in the long run and keep you moving for life.

  1. Early on, relative rest is key. In the early stages of treating a strained muscle, you should be resting the muscle to ensure the small muscle fibers that have been damaged have time to heal properly. Do not stretch in the early stages. You can use heat or ice for pain management. Avoid any painful activities such as the one that originally caused the injury. After a comprehensive assessment your physiotherapist will guide you by appropriately increasing your activities in order to avoid re-injury. Your physiotherapist may also use treatments such as electrotherapy, acupuncture and manual therapy to reduce healing time.
  2. Protection is sometimes necessary.  The challenge of having an injury is that we still need to use the injured area with everyday life.  This sometimes doesn’t allow our injury to heal so that’s when we use splinting or braces. Hand strains, for instance, can take a long time to heal since it is hard to rest this area of the body. Your physiotherapist will tape or brace just the strained area so that you can keep moving while your body heals.  They will also advise when this can be discontinued to allow you to progress beyond the acute stage. 
  3. Move Early to Restore Normal Function.Strained structures need to be strengthened while balance and dexterity are improved, so early and limited movement is extremely important.  As you heal, practice skills as simple as holding chopsticks or changing direction quickly on a soccer field. Small and simple changes to your movements, combined with adequate muscle strength, can prevent muscle strains in the long run. Your physiotherapist will educate you on how to prevent re-injury and guide you along the path back to your active lifestyle. 
  4. Not all strains are equal. The local area of a muscle strain is painful, swollen, red and bruised and the muscle may be weak and painful to use. Treatments for strains are individualized, based on the mechanism of injury, the degree of strain, the specific muscle at fault and the functional goals of the individual. Your physiotherapist will help you differentiate between a mild muscle strain that can be treated conservatively, versus a severe strain such as a complete tear that may require further medical attention. And your physiotherapist will correct any biomechanical issues and create an individualized exercise plan, including stretching and strengthening at the appropriate time intervals.

 

Physiotherapists are the rehabilitation specialists recommended most by physicians. They are university-educated health professionals who work with patients of all ages to diagnose and treat virtually any mobility issue. Physiotherapists provide care for orthopedic issues such as sport and workplace injuries, as well as cardiorespiratory and neurological conditions. As Canada’s most physically active health professionals, BC’s physiotherapists know how to keep British Columbians moving for life.

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Skiing & Boarding Healthy Tips

The 2010 Winter Olympics catapulted winter sports into the forefront of people’s awareness last year. As more and more British Columbians hit the slopes, it’s important to make sure participants have fun and remain pain and injury free. Always wear a helmet and ensure your equipment has been checked and tuned for the season. Whether you’re cruising a green run or racing through the gates, your physiotherapist can create a ski fit program that’s right for you.

Olympian Maëlle Ricker won the Gold Medal in the snowboard cross event at the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver, becoming the first Canadian woman to win a gold medal at home in the Olympics.

 If you experience pain during or after skiing or boarding, your physiotherapist can help.

 

Skiing & Boarding Tips to prevent injury, alleviate pain and keep you moving for life.

 

1. Develop strength in the off-season.
Cycling and weight training are great options for skiers and boarders. Cycling develops cardio and weight training strengthens the muscles needed to be explosive on the slopes. Your physiotherapist can develop an off-season program to improve your on-hill performance.

2. Warm up before hitting the slopes to prevent injury.
The lure of fresh tracks makes many people rush to the lifts and ignore a warm-up. However, a light jog and stretching beforehand will make those first powder runs even better and reduce your risk of injury.

3. Drink water.
It’s easy to skip rehydrating when you’re doing laps in the terrain park but make sure you take time to sip water. If you’re on the mountain multiple days in a row, it’s important to keep hydrated so your body can recover more easily after a long day on the hill.

4. Choose the right equipment.
Good boots that fit properly and a snowboard or skis that are tuned for the current conditions will make your day more enjoyable. Wearing a helmet that fits reduces the risk of a concussion and head injury.

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Lifting Safely Tips

Spring is here. And, if you’ve got the urge to Spring clean and you’re getting ready to clear out your attic, garage, basement or house, below are a few tips on how to lift objects without injuring yourself. By following these tips you can help minimize your risk of injury and still get everything to the curb on time.

Laura Patrick (Kids Physio Group  Private Clinic) and Mark Borslein (Gastown Physio & Pilates)
coach children and injured workers on how to lift without injury.


If you feel pain during or after lifting, your physiotherapist can help.

 

Safe Lifting Tips to keep you moving for life.

 

 

 

1. Warm up and plan before you lift.
To get your blood flowing and your joints lubricated do some practice squats, heel lifts and arm circles first. Plan ahead for your path of lifting; think twice, lift once. And, check to make sure the surface area is not slippery or uneven..

2. Lift with your legs not your back.
Stand as close as possible to the item you are lifting. Stand shoulder width apart and bend at the knees, not the waist so you use your legs and core rather than your back to lift. If the item is big and heavy, get help or use a dolly.

3. Wear proper footwear.
When you’re planning on lifting something, wear good shoes with low heels, not sandals, high heels or flip-flops. Don’t twist when you lift, move your feet to the new position.

4. Control the weight, don’t let it control you.
If you are lifting more than one thing, balance the weight equally between both hands; don’t lift a heavy item with one hand and a light item with the other. Plant your feet and lower your centre of gravity.

If you do hurt yourself while lifting after your Spring-cleaning endeavors, consult with your physiotherapist to create a program to alleviate the pain. BC physiotherapists are the most physically active healthcare professionals in Canada and the ones physicians recommend most.

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Running and Walking Safely

content/uploads/2012/10/Physio_Running_Walking1.jpg”>Running and walking are both great ways to stay in shape and keep fit. If you are new to running or are starting to walk for exercise after an illness, it’s best to work with your physiotherapist to develop a program suited for you that includes warm up and cool down stretches to help prevent injury.


Tony Gui (UBC Physiotherapy graduate) follows the Physio4 tips to
remain injury-free as he trains and runs marathons.


If you feel pain during or after running or walking, a physiotherapist can help.

 


Running & Walking Tips to prevent injury, alleviate pain and keep you moving for life.

 

 

1. Running & Walking Tips to prevent injury, alleviate pain and keep you moving for life.
The proper shoe can help maximize your efficiency and minimize your risk of injury. Try on many then select the shoe with the best shape for your foot. Your physiotherapist will assess whether arch supports or custom orthotics are necessary to improve your gait.

2. Start off slowly and build up your strength.
If you have been injured or are new to walking and running, follow a graduated program to help build your body’s tolerance to the stresses of running and walking. Too much too soon can cause re-injury and unnecessary soreness.

3. Walkers and runners are prone to overuse injuries.
These are often due to imbalances in strength and flexibility that you can correct through therapeutic exercises. Your physiotherapist can create a program designed specifically for you.

4. Choose walking or running to prevent osteoporosis later in life.
Weight bearing exercise provides controlled stress to your bones, helping to improve or maintain bone density. Your physiotherapist can help you develop a program specifically designed to maximize your bone health.

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Knee Injury Prevention Tips

Knee_injury_prevention4 Tips to Minimize Long-Term Knee Damage and Heal Faster

The knee joint is made up of bone, cartilage, ligaments and fluid. Muscles and tendons help the knee joint move. When any of these structures are injured, there will be knee problems, specifically pain and difficulty moving.Common knee conditions include patella femoral pain syndrome, IT band friction syndrome, and ligament sprains. Tears to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are caused by a sudden twisting motion in the knee.

If you have pain in your knee either from overuse or through a sudden injury, your physiotherapist can work with you to minimize long-term damage and help you to heal faster. Correcting muscular imbalances and following the Physio-4 for Knee Injury can prevent further knee problems and keep you moving for life.

  1. Correct muscular imbalances. Most overuse injuries of the knee develop gradually due to muscular imbalances and poor movement patterns. Your physiotherapist can show you corrective exercises to address the muscle imbalances and improve the way you move.
  2. Strengthen your hips. Strengthening your hips and improving core muscle strength will reduce the risk of adversely loading your knee joints. Stretching the muscles that attach into your hips/knees/ankles will also minimize compression of these joints. Your physiotherapist can show you how.
  3. Protect your joints. If you have any degenerative changes in your knees (e.g. osteoarthritis) your physiotherapist can show you how to protect your joints during activities of daily living, prescribe exercises to improve the strength of supporting muscles, advise you on safe forms of exercise, and assess your footwear.
  4. Correct movement patterns. Poor movement patterns during sports (e.g. incorrect landings during jumping) greatly increase the risk of traumatic knee injuries. Your physiotherapist can teach you how to move properly and minimize this risk.

Physiotherapists are the rehabilitation specialists recommended most by physicians. They are university-educated health professionals who work with patients of all ages to diagnose and treat virtually any mobility issue. Physiotherapists provide care for orthopedic issues such as sport and workplace injuries, as well as cardiorespiratory and neurological conditions. As Canada’s most physically active health professionals, BC’s physiotherapists know how to keep British Columbians moving for life.

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